Burma’s ‘bin Laden of Buddhism’


Buddhist monk Wirathu in Yangon, Burma. The 46-year-old has been blamed for inspiring sectarian violence

Radical buddhist nationalism is sweeping Burma, and at the forefront of the movement is a group more commonly associated with peace and tolerance: monks.

The most prominent among them is the controversial cleric U Wirathu, who gives passionate sermons from his Mandalay base calling on Buddhists to stand up against the “Muslim threat”.

“I believe Islam is a threat not just to Buddhism, but to the [Burmese] people and the country,” says the monk, whose boyish face and toothy grin belie the name his critics have given him: “the Buddhist bin Laden”.

The 46-year-old has been blamed for inspiring sectarian violence, which began in the long-volatile western state of Rakhine bordering Burma’s mostly Muslim neighbour, Bangladesh, but has spread to areas unused to such tension.

Hundreds of Muslims have been killed, mosques burned and many thousands driven from their homes.

Burma’s president, Thein Sein, will face demands to rein in anti-Muslim violence when he arrives on an official visit to Britain on Sunday. He has been invited by David Cameron to reward the gradual moves towards restoring democracy to Burma that began with the release from house arrest of Aung San Suu Kyi, the opposition leader, in 2011.

The former general, once a part of the military junta that ruled Burma for almost 50 years, has been criticised for allowing the ethnic attacks to continue. He will also be questioned over official tolerance of outspoken figures such as Wirathu who are blamed by many for whipping up hatred against Muslims.

It is an accusation Wirathu denies, instead blaming all the religious violence on Burma’s Muslims, who make up 5 per cent of the population.

In the leafy courtyard of the New Masoeyain monastery, where he lives and teaches, billboards display gruesome images of butchered and burned monks and of Buddhist women raped and killed – alongside pictures from around the world depicting Islamist violence.

Rohingya_Burma_Mya_2616797c

A woman walks past a burnt out area in Sittwe, Myanmar, where dozens of Rohingya families used to live until fires                                                                                destroyed the homes (GETTY)

He insists he does not believe in, and has not encouraged Buddhist attacks such as the riots a year ago in Rakhine that left 200 people dead and up to 140,000, mainly Muslims, homeless. Nor, apparently, has he joined those monks who have reportedly taken part in attacks.

He has, however, previously compared Muslims to “mad dogs” and called them “troublemakers”. Monks hold considerable sway in Burma, so when they condemn a single ethnic group at a time of political upheaval and uncertainty, critics say it is hardly surprising if violence flares. The solutions Wirathu offers to the perceived threat to Burma’s Buddhist majority are certainly provocative.

“I don’t know how you tame a wild elephant in your country,” he told The Sunday Telegraph, when asked what exactly he means when he says Buddhist Burmese should “stand up for themselves”, “but here the first thing you do is take away all their food and water. Then when the elephant is starving and weak you give him a little bit of water and teach him one word. Then you give him a little bit of food and teach him some more. That’s how we tame the elephants here.”

This is his metaphor for the imposition of economic sanctions on Muslims, who are also known as Rohingya, an ethnic grouping in the northwest that has long been denied Burmese citizenship. Buddhists, he insists, should not shop in Muslim stores, nor sell land to Muslims. This principle is being promoted by a movement, which he started in conjunction with other monks from southern Burma, known as 969.

Those figures are said to represent Buddhist virtues. In the form of a logo, however, they are a badge used to help supporters identify businesses as Buddhist-run.

It adorns videos distributed by the group showing scenes of destruction and violence supposedly caused by Muslims. It is also appearing increasingly at rallies, such as one held in Rangoon last week to protest against a front cover of Time magazine which described Wirathu as “The Face of Buddhist Terror”.

Wirathu has also proposed a ban on marriage between Buddhists and Muslims. “Women should not get married to Islamic men. If one Buddhist woman gets married to an Islamic man, it’s not just one less Buddhist [because Islam requires her to convert], but they will have one more and they will have lots of children so the population balance can change quickly.”

The poet and artist Soe Wei, who was a political prisoner of the Burmese military junta for two years, says that like many Burmese he finds it difficult to criticise a monk, though he does not share all of Wirathu’s opinions. Pressed on whether he sees Wirathu as a figure of terror or a man of peace, Soe Wei shakes his head then smiles wryly.

“I don’t see him as a man of peace. I’ve never seen anyone in authority really willing to have peace in Myanmar.”

via Burma’s ‘bin Laden of Buddhism’ – Telegraph.

Advertisements

About Old Boy

Love the past and the future but live in the present

Posted on July 17, 2013, in Buddhism, Religion and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Syed Abir

“ জীবন মানে অনিশ্চিৎ ভ্রমণ

sorryless

Warm . . . warmer . . . disco!

let me photograph you softly

photographs on the street

| SCRIPTEUM |

Blog de escritura

Sally.CS

"Érase una vez una gitana, que escribía historias de amor"

territori del '900

identità luoghi scritture del '900 toscano

fountain hues

the journey of a poetry

Flavorful Delights

A collection of recipes, food inspirations, and finding joy in cooking

Cafė com filosofia

A verdade existe!

From 1 Blogger 2 Another

Sharing Great Blog Posts

A Better Man

Make a Start

johncoyote

Poetry, story and real life.

passaporte no bolso

blogue de viagens

Art Bacchant

drunk on the arts

optimisticlifeat30

The essence of Poetry

Fun Freedom Fables

Stay happy, think positive & live life to the fullest

The Rolling Paper Company

Rolling papers for customized cigarettes has developed from rolling tobacco and weed in dried leaves of trees to rolling them in a paper.

andycritiques

Film & Television Reviews From The Perspective Of A Film & Televison Lover

Truth Troubles

Why people hate the truths of the world.

The Culture Tome

An Online Journal For Appreciating The Past

The Comic Vault

Unlock your inner geek and step inside!

sandsoftime10

A peep into Megha's mind

Education Motivation Inspiration

Warm welcome! This is more than an exploration. Discovery of new ideas and new ways of being.

EXPLORING FOR KNOWLEDGE.

REASONING IS THE FOUNDATION.

Perfect-Style-Knower

Visual Perception- Hot Edgy Erotica Site

THE BOOKS THAT TIME FORGOT.

Reviewing books that time has passed by.

Peach6972's Re🤗Blog🥀

lonly n depress😢🐘make my day 🌷⚘

outofwak (artworldwar)

we are all empty circles, through which the creative power of the universe passes through, whether we like it or not..

Why'd Multiple Sclerosis pick me

My Life with Multiple SCLEROSIS

Windows on Worlds

Because you speak to me in words and I look at you with feelings

Crackdown Review

A place to search something like movie, anime, novel, manga, etc. reviews

Dave's Corner of the Universe

Where strange fact and stranger fiction collide

Trust and Believe in the Unseen

Live with Light of Faith

#FILMose

Crítica para quem gosta de Cinema.

Gaston Bessette, Photographie

La passion de la photo-Photographs as a passion

hands in the garden

short poems for short attention spans

Empowered

Everyday

Iain Kelly

Fiction Writing

The Müscleheaded Blog

"Nothing Exceeds Like Superfluous Jejunity "

After the Final Curtain

"People buy tickets to theatres, not movies." -- Marcus Loew

cracked rear viewer

Fresh takes on retro pop culture

%d bloggers like this: