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Coming to a Cinema near You- The Bad Seed

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Satirical Illustrations by Pawel Kuczynski


Polish illustrator Pawel Kuczynski cleverly uses satire to portray today’s social, political and cultural reality.

At first sight, his illustrations might seem funny, but when you look closer, they actually show some serious problems of today’s world.

Born in 1976, Pawel is a graduate of Fine Arts Academy in Poznan. The artist began drawing satirical illustrations back in 2004, and so far has been “rewarded with 92 prizes and distinctions“. In 2005, Pawel Kuszynski received “Eryk” award from Association of Polish Cartoonists for getting a record number of awards in international competitions

 

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Pawel Kuczynski art

Prismatic Cityscape Paintings


Artist Micko-Vic’s stunning acrylic paintings capture cityscapes in a fragmented style.

The vibrant and immediately eye-catching pieces draw you in. There is little known about Vic, but his works are remarkable. His process to create the gorgeous scenes is quite simple: firstly, he sketches out the picture with a pencil and brush, then he follows the picture with acrylic paint and impasto gels with a palette knife. He mixes bold colors and imagery to create a layered effect. The final product is an array of illustrious textured paintings. They have depth and feature varied cities and the people who live in them. All of his works are centered on cubist techniques and contemporary coloration.

Micko-Vic’s acrylic paintings are modern masterpieces that stand out and lighten up any mood.

Click on image below to view gallery

Digital Art – Denis Dubois


Surreal Collages Redefine Ordinary Objects in a Funny Way

Photographer, graphic designer, and digital artist Denis Dubois uses his multi-faceted skills to produce a variety of satirical illustrations. The intriguing images are filled with humorous undertones that often surreally redefine the purpose of ordinary objects. Syringes and crutches, typically used to aid people, are transformed into a form of artillery through Dubois’ cleverly composed collages.The Granville, France-based artist’s vast body of work touches on a broad range of ideas, though there are the recurring visual themes of weapons and imminent pain at the hand of inconveniently placed sharp blades or an alligator at the end of a quirky, entrapping race. In one image, there is a razor edge at the base of a violin where the chin rest is normally placed while yet another one of Dubois’ assemblages features the neck of a guitar lined with jagged razors.

A Gallery of Stunning Digital Art part 5 OF 5


Digital Art by Igor Vitkovskiy

Steampunk City

Steampunk City in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Steampunk Ships

Steampunk Ships in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Digital Art by Ken Barthelmey

Demon Lord

Demon Lord in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Hercules vs Hydra

Hercules vs Hydra in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Monster vs Hero

Monster vs Hero in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

A Gallery of Stunning Digital Art part 4


How far can the imagination of the fantasy artist go? Apparently, judging by the art we have for you today, it is limitless! So, are you looking for some inspiration? You have came to right place. Relax and enjoy this gallery:

Digital Art by Oleg Shekhovtsov

Grandfather Nurgle

Grandfather Nurgle in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Snir God of Pretence

Snir God of Pretence in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Shadow and Corrupted

Shadow and Corrupted in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Scarecrow

Scarecrow in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

The Riddler

The Riddler in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Adele

Adele in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Digital Art by Escudero

Doom Warriors

Doom Warriors in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Grey Hunters

Grey Hunters in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Spellweaver

Spellweaver in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Batallon Fenix

Batallon Fenix in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Via

http://speckyboy.com/2013/03/24/a-gallery-of-stunning-digital-art/

A Gallery of Stunning Digital Art part 3 OF 5


How far can the imagination of the fantasy artist go? Apparently, judging by the art we have for you today, it is limitless! So, are you looking for some Sunday morning inspiration? You have came to right place. Relax and enjoy this gallery:

Digital Art by Thomas Wievegg

Viking

Viking in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Sci-fi Fun

Sci-fi Fun in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Arena

Arena in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

System is collapsing

System is collapsing in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Black Angel

Black Angel in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Explorers

Explorers in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Digital Art by Ferdinand Ladera

The Towers of Keilah

The Towers of Keilah in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Ibaloy Warrior

Ibaloy Warrior in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

The Town of Aldackelm

The Town of Aldackelm in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Surrender of the ashed Sanctuary

Surrender of the ashed Sanctuary in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Invasion

Invasion in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Via

http://speckyboy.com/2013/03/24/a-gallery-of-stunning-digital-art/

A Gallery of Stunning Digital Art part 2 of 5


How far can the imagination of the fantasy artist go? Apparently, judging by the art we have for you today, it is limitless! So, are you looking for some inspiration? You have came to right place. Relax and enjoy this gallery:

Digital Art by Masoume Rezaei

Story of Nature

Story of nature in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Beneath the Seasons

Beneath the Seasons in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Disillusion Glance

Disillusion Glance in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Digital Art by Stanislav Novarenko

SUB-Zero

SUB-Zero in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Beatrice

Beatrice in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Shaman

Shaman in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Digital Art by Jordi Gonzalez

Pain

Pain in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Warrior

Warrior in 60 Stunning Digital Artworks from Increateble Gallery

Aztec Warrior

Via

http://speckyboy.com/2013/03/24/a-gallery-of-stunning-digital-art/

A Gallery of Stunning Digital Art part 1 of 5


How far can the imagination of the fantasy artist go? Apparently, judging by the art we have for you today, it is limitless! So, are you looking for some inspiration? You have came to right place. Relax and enjoy this gallery:

Digital Art by David Gaillet

Dragon Knight

A Walk in the Park

Baroness Frankenstein

My Beloved

The Death of Balin

Instinct

Digital Art by Daniel Vijoi

Mother Care

Kingfisher

My Ten Wheel House

Terrain Mech

Back to the Home Tree

Part 2 tomorrow

via A Gallery of Stunning Digital Art.

via A Gallery of Stunning Digital Art.

Museum of War Syria – By Tammam Azzam


130423_1-KlimtTammam Azzam left his home in Damascus at the beginning of the Syrian uprising. Now based in Dubai, he’s supporting what he calls the “revolution” with his art, which draws on the works of great European masters — from da Vinci to Matisse, Goya to Picasso. He digitally lifts iconic images from famous paintings and sets them amid the rubble of Syria’s cities to highlight the profound destruction humanity is capable of inflicting. “Klimt’s The Kiss shows the love and relationship between people, and I have juxtaposed this with the capacity of hate the regime holds for its people,” Azzam says. “When I am able to return to Syria, I will paint this upon the edifices. Perhaps then it may be completed on a different wall. I cannot say whether this one will still be standing.”

Above: Based on Gustav Klimt’s The Kiss, Douma.

130423_2-Gaugin
Based on Paul Gauguin‘s Femmes de TahitiZaatari refugee camp, Jordan.

130423_3-Goya

Based on Francisco Goya‘s The Third of May 1808, Daraa.

130423_4-Munch

Based on Edvard Munch‘s The Scream, Deir Ezzor.

130423_5-MonaLisa

Based on Leonardo da Vinci‘s Mona Lisa, Homs.

130424_6-Matisse

Based on Henri Matisse‘s Dance (I), Homs.

130423_8-Warhol

Based on Andy Warhol’s Elvis silk-screens, Homs.

130423_9-Dali

Based on Salvador Dali’s Sleep, Idlib.

130423_7-VanGogh (1)

ased on Vincent van Gogh’s The Starry Night, Homs.

via Museum of War – By Tammam Azzam | Foreign Policy.

via Museum of War – By Tammam Azzam | Foreign Policy.

Battleship Potemkin 1925


Considered one of the most important films in the history of silent pictures, as well as possibly Eisenstein’s greatest work, Battleship Potemkin brought Eisenstein’s theories of cinema art to the world in a powerful showcase;

his emphasis on montage, his stress of intellectual contact, and his treatment of the mass instead of the individual as the protagonist. The film tells the story of the mutiny on the Russian ship Prince Potemkin during the 1905 uprising.

via Battleship Potemkin HQ – YouTube.

via Battleship Potemkin HQ – YouTube.

The Mutiny on the Potemkin

The Russian navy in the year of the abortive revolution of 1905 still preserved the harsh conditions and brutal punishments of an earlier age. The Potemkin was a new battleship of the Black Sea fleet, commissioned in 1903, with a crew of 800. It was not a happy ship and some of the crew harboured revolutionary sympathies, in particular a forceful young non-commissioned officer named Matyushenko, who took a leading part in what followed. At sea on June 14th (June 27th, Old Style), the cooks complained that the meat for the men’s borscht was riddled with maggots. The ship’s doctor took a look and decided that the maggots were only flies’ eggs and the meat was perfectly fit to eat. Later a deputation went and complained to the captain and his executive officer, Commander Giliarovsky, about worms in their soup. Their spokesman was a seaman named Valenchuk, who expressed himself in such plain language that Giliarovsky flew into a violent rage, pulled out a gun and shot him dead on the spot. The others seized Giliarovsky and threw him overboard. As he floundered in the water he was shot and killed.

Others of the crew joined in. The captain, the doctor and several other officers were killed and the rest of the officers were shut away in one of the cabins. The Potemkin hoisted the red flag and a ‘people’s committee’ was chosen to take charge. The chairman was Matyushenko.
The ship made for the port of Odessa, where disturbances and strikes had already been going on for two weeks, with clashes between demonstrators, Cossacks and police. The trains and trams had stopped running and most of the shops had closed. People began to gather at the waterfront after the Potemkin arrived in the harbour at 6 am on the 15th. Valenchuk’s body was brought ashore by an honour guard and placed on a bier close to a flight of steps which twenty years afterwards would play an immortal and immensely magnified role in the famous ‘Odessa steps’ sequence of Sergei Eisenstein’s film. A paper pinned on the corpse’s chest said, ‘This is the body of Valenchuk, killed by the commander for having told the truth. Retribution has been meted out to the commander.’

Citizens brought food for the seamen and flowers for the bier. As the day wore on and word spread, the crowd steadily swelled, listening to inflammatory speeches, joining in revolutionary songs and some of them sinking considerable quantities of vodka. People began looting the warehouses and setting fires until much of the harbour area was in flames.

Meanwhile, martial law had been declared and the governor had been instructed by telegram from Tsar Nicholas II to take firm action. Troops were sent to the harbour in the evening, took up commanding positions and at about midnight opened fire on the packed crowd, which had no escape route. Some people were shot and some jumped or fell into the water and drowned. The sailors on the Potemkin did nothing. The casualties were put at 2,000 dead and 3,000 seriously wounded.

Calm was quickly restored and Valenchuk was allowed a decent burial by the authorities, but the sailors’ demand for an amnesty was turned down and on June 18th the Potemkin set out to sea. The crew were hoping to provoke mutinies in other ships of the Black Sea fleet, but there were only a few minor disturbances, easily put down. The mutineers sailed west to the Romanian port of Constanza for badly needed fresh water and coal, but the Romanians demanded that they surrender the ship. They refused and sailed back eastwards to Feodosia in the Crimea, where a party landed to seize supplies, but was driven off. The Potemkin sailed disconsolately back to Constanza again, and on June 25th surrendered to the Romanian authorities, who handed the ship over to Russian naval officers.

The incident had petered out, though it caused the regime serious alarm about the extent of revolutionary feeling in the armed forces. Its most lasting legacy was Eisenstein’s film, The Battleship Potemkin, (1925) and a riveting essay in propaganda rather than history.

http://www.historytoday.com/richard-cavendish/mutiny-potemkin

Pictorial Religious themes 9 – The Alien God


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God, so atrocious in the Old Testament, so attractive in the New–the Jekyl and Hyde of sacred romance.
– Notebook, 1904

God’s inhumanity to man makes countless thousands mourn.
– Notebook, 1898

Mark Twain

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