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‘Embarrassing’ Holes as US Govt Rests Case Against Bradley Manning


Defense team now expected to motion for dismissal of charges for ‘lack of evidence’

– Lauren McCauley, staff writer

(Image via Bradley Manning Support Network)After 14 days and 80 witnesses, the United States government prosecuting Pfc. Bradley Manning in the long-awaited trial against the military whistleblower has rested their case.

As Manning’s defense team prepares to present their case next week, they are hoping Manning’s prospects have risen after the government was forced to close their portion of the trial with an “embarrassing admission” that the Army had misplaced Manning’s military contract, the Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) , which laid out the terms of his access to classified information.

Over three years after being arrested for leaking details of military atrocities and intelligence to WikiLeaks, Manning is on trial for 21 charges including aiding the enemy, which carries a possible life sentence.

Ahead of the trial, Judge Colonel Denise Lind stated that in order to prove their charge of ‘aiding the enemy’ the prosecution must demonstrate beyond a reasonable doubt that Manning had “a general evil intent,” in that he “had to know he was dealing, directly or indirectly, with an enemy of the US.”

Lind added that the soldier cannot be found guilty if he acted “inadvertently, accidentally, or negligently.”

Reporting from the trial, The Guardian’s Ed Pilkington writes, “Whether or not the prosecution succeeds in meeting that high bar set by Lind will have far-reaching implications, not just for Manning, whose fate depends on it, but also for the wider relationship in the US between government, whistleblowers and a free press.”

Explaining the gaff related to Manning’s missing military contract, Pilkington also reports:

The document is important as it clarifies whether or not the soldier exceeded the terms of the authorized access to secret documents through his work computer that he directly agreed to.

[…] The AUP could be relevant to charges that Manning knowingly exceeded authorized access to a secret internet network, that he obtained classified information without authorization and that he violated the computer fraud and abuse act.

Consequently, the defense is expected to begin next Monday with a motion to have a number of the charges against Manning dismissed on the grounds of lack of evidence.

“Whether or not the prosecution succeeds in [proving he ‘aided the enemy] will have far-reaching implications, not just for Manning, whose fate depends on it, but also for the wider relationship in the US between government, whistleblowers and a free press.” -Guardian reporter Ed Pilkington

To counter the ‘aiding the enemy’ charge, Manning’s attorney David Coombs will argue that, rather than premeditation, the soldier was provoked to leak information after witnessing a series of military atrocities and that he specifically chose information “that he believed the public should hear and see, information that would make the world a better place.”

Manning has already pleaded guilty to a number of charges which carry a combined maximum prison term of 20 years, including reduced charges on seven of eight espionage counts and two counts of computer fraud. He has also admitted guilt for violating a military regulation prohibiting wrongful storage of classified information.

“Such a substantial admission of responsibility has failed to satisfy military prosecutors, who are clearly determined to send a bold message that will give any would-be leaker pause,” notes Pilkington, who adds that the “aggression displayed” by the US government carries “additional significance” in light of NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden’s ongoing attempts toseek amnesty from US persecution.

All of the trial transcripts are made available to the public via the Freedom of the Press Foundation, which has led a grassroots initiative to crowd-fund a stenographer for the duration of the trial.

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Analyzing the Prosecution Case in the Bradley Manning Trial


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The prosecution in the Bradley Manning court martial rested their case on Tuesday of this week, well ahead of schedule, taking only 14 days in the courtroom. A casual observer might think the prosecution finished early because they have an easy job: Manning has admitted to leaking the vast majority of documents in question, and he’s already pleaded guilty to a list of crimes on his charge sheet that could get him 20 years in a military prison.

But Manning and his defense team argue his actions don’t warrant the most serious charges against him, the most controversial being ‘Aiding the Enemy.’ That could get him life in prison.

In its opening statement, the prosecution put a graphic up on a courtroom screen— It was the Wikileaks “Most wanted list,” a wish list posted on their website in 2009, the year before Manning began leaking documents. Chief prosecutor, Captain Joe Morrow, said the government would show that Manning used it as a ‘shopping list,’ and they would show even more direct coordination between Manning and Wikileaks’ founder Julian Assange. But we saw little of that in court.

“They have no forensic evidence connecting that- what they have is circumstantial evidence,” according to Adam Klasfeld, who has been covering the court martial at Fort Meade, Maryland, for Courthouse News. He says the prosecution’s own experts have been unable to deliver evidence Manning had followed directions, even in-directly, from Wikileaks. The forensic analyst called by the prosecution “didn’t find any visit to the [Wikileaks] URL,” on Manning’s computer, and didn’t find any evidence of communication in the “unallocated space,” on Manning’s computer, the area where deleted e-mails would remain. Klasfeld says the prosecution argued the lack of material in the unallocated space was suspicious. “So in the absence of that evidence, the government’s theory was that Manning had wiped his computer, and so that’s why it wasn’t found there,” he says.

What the government did show was uncontested evidence that the leaked material made it into the hands of Al Qaeda, citing Al Qaeda propaganda, and records recovered from Osama bin Laden’s Abbottabad compound. But Eugene Fidell, who teaches military justice at Yale law school says even this connection is indirect.

“I think the government’s effort on the aiding the enemy charge was basically predicated on circumstantial evidence,” he says. “And if you connect—if you could put enough dots on the chart—the theory is that the Military judge would almost inevitably connect them.”

But as Fidell points out, the prosecution has not been able to provide as many dots as promised in their opening statement. “One thing that teaches is the danger of making promises in an opening statement that you can’t keep,” he says. “As it played out, I think the government may have concluded it either had made the demonstrated by circumstantial evidence or it decided it hadn’t, and couldn’t, and that may explain why they didn’t call many of the witnesses they said they were going to call and why they… wrapped up the prosecution case well before anyone anticipated.”

Bradley Manning’s team is scheduled to begin their defense on Monday, but Fidell expects that over this holiday weekend they will be drafting a new motion to dismiss the charges against the 25-year-old private.

via Analyzing the Prosecution Case in the Bradley Manning Trial | @pritheworld.

Prosecution Case vs. Bradley Manning Threatens First Amendment Rights to Free Speech and Press


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The prosecution rested its case Tuesday in the court martial of Bradley Manning, the Army private who has admitted to leaking 700,000 documents exposing US military atrocities and other crimes to the WikiLeaks web site in April of 2010.

The prosecutor, Major Ashden Fein, dropped one of the 22 charges against Manning. That charge alleged Manning had leaked intelligence to an “enemy” whose name is classified.

Over the course of five weeks, the prosecution has sought to establish by means of circumstantial evidence that Manning intended to send classified information to Al Qaeda and other terrorist organizations and conspired with WikiLeaks journalists to do so.

In charging Manning with “aiding the enemy” under Article 104 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, the US government is equating the publication of classified information about its secret and illegal activities with espionage, treason and aiding terrorists. It is doing so on the spurious grounds that such information can end up in the hands of forces considered by the government to be hostile.

In fact, as the Obama administration and the military well know, Manning released the information to inform the American people of war crimes being carried out by the US government in Iraq and Afghanistan and diplomatic intrigues targeting many other countries.

The clear implication of the government’s case is the position that any publication or organization that publishes leaked classified information or defends whistleblowers such as Manning is itself engaging in criminal and treasonous acts. The prosecution acknowledged as much in January when it argued that its case against Manning, which implicates WikiLeaks in treasonous and pro-terrorist activities, would apply equally if the Army private had passed his information to the New York Times .

This sweeping attack on First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and the press occurs in the context of threats to prosecute journalists such as the Guardian ’s Glenn Greenwald for publishing former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden’s exposures of US government spying, and revelations that the government seized the phone records of Associated Press reporters and tapped into the email of Fox News’ James Rosen, who was named a co-conspirator by the Justice Department in relation to State Department leaks.

Proceedings in the court martial will resume next Monday with defense motions to dismiss many of the remaining charges for lack of evidence.

Prosecutors claimed that Manning was in direct contact with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and that the latter directed Manning in the selection, downloading and transmission of classified documents. As evidence of this supposed coordination, the government showed the court a WikiLeaks web posting of a “most wanted list” of government secrets, though there was no evidence that Manning took a cue from this list, or ever saw it. The same was true with a tweet encouraging the collection of military emails by WikiLeaks.

Prosecutors also allege that Manning knowingly violated protocol for handling classified information, but cross-examination of a prosecution witness revealed that the Army had lost the document Manning signed acknowledging that he understood the terms in question. The Army’s failure to produce this document may result in dismissal of some of the charges.

In its effort to establish that Manning leaked information out of “evil intent” to “aid the enemy,” the prosecution alleged that he first leaked a classified video of a US air strike in November of 2009, within days of his arrival in Iraq, and not, as Manning states, in April 2010. Manning admits that he leaked the video, but says he did so following a change of conscience in late December of 2009, when he saw a video of a roadside bomb killing civilians whose vehicles were forced off the road by a US military convoy.

A prosecution witness had to admit that the copy of the video allegedly transmitted by Manning in 2009 did not match the version found on Manning’s computer.

Even if Manning did not intend for Al Qaeda to have access to the leaked information, prosecutors contend, he still should have known that WikiLeaks was a threat to the US Army. The evidence offered to show this was a 32-page intelligence report by military counterintelligence on WikiLeaks, which concluded that sensitive or classified information WikiLeaks received “could be of value to foreign intelligence and security services (FISS), foreign military forces, foreign insurgents, and foreign terrorist groups for collecting information or for planning attacks against US forces, both within the United States and abroad.”

Manning allegedly leaked this very report, which WikiLeaks made public in March 2010. Since Manning leaked the document, prosecutors allege, he must have read it.

Manning has not denied his leaking of documents to WikiLeaks and has offered a guilty plea to charges relating to this. Prosecutors have rejected the plea offer.

Manning strictly denies the charge of “aiding the enemy,” which carries a possible death sentence.

The entire trial is a travesty of justice aimed at silencing and punishing those who expose criminality by the US government rather than those who are responsible for war crimes and crimes against the democratic rights of the American people.

via Prosecution Case vs. Bradley Manning Threatens First Amendment Rights to Free Speech and Press | Global Research.

Bradley Manning Must not be Forgotten


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With thousands of articles being written about Edward Snowden, many of them repetitious, we must remember another whistleblower who is presently on trial.  Bradley Manning must not be forgotten.

Private Manning is being court-martialed for giving secret information to WikiLeaks in 2009 and 2012, while he was a junior intelligence analyst stationed in Iraq. Government prosecutors claim that Manning had obtained 700,000 files, combat videos, and diplomatic transmissions.

The prosecution’s case ended today, Tuesday.  The defense will begin on Monday.

Manning’s lawyer, David Coombs, says that the young man leaked information, but believed it was not harmful to United States interests because it contained no operational value.

Julian Assange, an Australian, says the charges are reprisal for WikiLeaks’ publication of information embarrassing to the U.S. and other governments.

Mairead Corrigan-Maguire, an author and peace prize winner, believes that Manning should receive the ‘Nobel Peace Prize.’  She believes he should be credited for helping to end the war in Iraq, and keeping the United States from participating in other conflicts.

Ms. Corrigan-Maguire says this about peace:  “Peace is more than simply the absence of war; it is the active creation of something better. Alfred Nobel recognized this when he created alongside those for chemistry, literature, medicine and physics, an annual prize for outstanding contributions in peace. Nobel’s foresight is a reminder to us all that peace must be created, maintained, and advanced, and it is indeed possible for one individual to have an extraordinary impact.”

I’ve never read a better definition.

Ms. Corrigan-Maguire recently returned from Syria.  She spoke with refugees, rebels, and Syrian security forces.  She says that hawks such as John McCain are wrong about assisting the rebels.  The majority of the extreme violence is the product of outside military components on both sides.  She said that the ‘true rebels’ and Syrian forces, all want to find a way to a peaceful end to the conflict.

She said that before Manning’s actions, and a growing condemnation of our continued presence in Iraq by the American people, Syria would already have been invaded by a number of U.S. forces.

Transparency of crimes against humanity is prevalent in the Middle East today.  She said if Manning had not taken actions, the world would not have known the truth about the atrocities inside Iraq.  US forces committed covert crimes in the name of spreading democracy in Iraq, killing innocent civilians in incidents such as the one depicted in the “Collateral Murder” video, and supported Iraqi prisoner torture.

She points out that Manning is the only one on trial.  None of those who committed inhumane acts during the Iraqi conflict have been brought up on charges.

Ms. Corrigan-McGuire’s final words:  “I hope American leaders will embrace the U.S. constitution, and base their national and foreign policies on ethical values, human rights and international law.”

Alfred James reporting    OP-ED

via Bradley Manning Must not be Forgotten | The Guardian Express.

Bradley Manning should win the Nobel Peace Prize


As a peace prize winner myself, I am nominating Manning for this honor for his work to help end the Iraq War and other conflicts

By e

Peace is more than simply the absence of war; it is the active creation of something better. Alfred Nobel recognized this when he created alongside those for chemistry, literature, medicine and physics, an annual prize for outstanding contributions in peace. Nobel’s foresight is a reminder to us all that peace must be created, maintained, and advanced, and it is indeed possible for one individual to have an extraordinary impact. For this year’s prize, I have chosen to nominate US Army Pfc Bradley Manning, for I can think of no one more deserving. His incredible disclosure of secret documents to Wikileaks helped end the Iraq War, and may have helped prevent further conflicts elsewhere.

I recently visited Syria, where I met a few of the millions of refugees and internally displaced people whose lives have been torn apart by the ongoing conflict in that country. I learned from those I spoke to, both within the government and in opposition groups, that while there is a legitimate and long-overdue movement for peace and non-violent reform in Syria, the worst acts of violence are being perpetrated by outside groups. Extremist groups from around the world have converged upon Syria, bent on turning this conflict into one of ideological hatred.

In recent years this would have spelled an undeniable formula for United States intervention. However, the world has changed in the years since Manning’s whistleblowing — the Middle East especially. In Bahrain, Tunisia, Egypt, and now Turkey, advocates of democracy have joined together to fight against their own governments’ control of information, and used the free-flowing data of social media to help build enormously successful non-violent movements. Some activists of what has come to be known as the Arab Spring have even directly credited Bradley Manning, and the information he disclosed, as an inspiration for their struggles.

In a Middle East newly dedicated to democratic flow of information, those who would commit human rights violations can more easily be held accountable. If not for whistleblower Bradley Manning, the world still might not know of how US forces committed covert crimes in the name of spreading democracy in Iraq, killing innocent civilians in incidents such as the one depicted in the “Collateral Murder” video, and supporting Iraqi prisoner torture. Now, those who would support foreign intervention in the Middle East know that every action would be scrutinized under international human rights law. Clearly, this is for the best. International peacekeepers, as well as experts and civilians inside Syria, are nearly unanimous in their view that United States involvement would only worsen this conflict.

Around the world, Manning is hailed as a peacemaker and a hero. His nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize is a reflection of this. Yet at his home in America, Manning stands trial for charges of espionage and “aiding the enemy.” This should not be considered a refutation of his candidacy — rather, he is in good company. Burmese politician Aung San Suu Kyi and Chinese writer Liu Xiaobo were each awarded the prize in recent years while imprisoned by their home countries.

Last week at Manning’s trial, the public learned that at the time Manning released his information, WikiLeaks stated they wanted to publish “the concealed documents or recordings most sought after by a country’s journalists, activists, historians, lawyers, police or human rights investigators.” Manning’s disclosures to Wikileaks only “aided the enemy,” as his prosecutors charge, if the enemy is international cooperation and peace itself.

Manning is the only one on trial, yet what of those who committed the atrocities he revealed? The United States, the most militarized country on earth, should stand for something better than war. Its government must be open to “debates, discussions and reforms” concerning its foreign policy, to use Manning’s own words. By heeding Pfc Bradley Manning’s message on the importance of transparency, America’s government can once again rebuild its image in the eyes of the world, and spread democracy not through foreign invasions, but through setting a strong example.

I hope American leaders will embrace the U.S. constitution, and base their national and foreign policies on ethical values, human rights and international law.

http://www.peacepeople.com

Mairead Corrigan-Maguire was awarded the 1976 Nobel Peace Prize for her extraordinary actions to help end the deep ethnic/political conflict in her native Northern Ireland. She shares the award (more…)

via OpEdNews – Article: Bradley Manning should win the Nobel Peace Prize.

Perspectives on Pfc. Bradley Manning from an anti-war veteran


As an anti-war veteran, my perspective on the Bradley Manning trial is that capitalism/imperialism has once again turned truth into a victim of war.

The Manning court martial trial presents challenges to vets. The government public relations campaign puts out allegations, disinformation and outright lies about what Manning is alleged to have done. Too often veterans are expected to support the official government and Pentagon positions no matter what, but anti-war vets typically don’t fit this traditional mold. We are outspoken, go against the grain and are demonstrative, for which we are criticized and attacked by conservative and pro-war forces.

The protests at Fort Meade, Md. where Pfc. Manning’s trial is taking place include many vets who are members of a number of anti-war veterans organizations as well as some who are unaffiliated.

As a Vietnam-era vet I’ve seen the attacks and lies before. I got out of the navy in 1969, fourteen months before the Pentagon Papers hit the streets. The Pentagon Papers validated what I had known to be true for the second half of my four-year enlistment: the government lied to get us into war and continued to lie to keep us fighting. Many of us veterans consider Bradley Manning to be this generation’s Daniel Ellsberg, the whistleblower who leaked the Pentagon Papers.

Political and military “leaders” have consistently lied to get public support for waging wars in other people’s countries, and the corporate media falls in line until long after the fact, when the truth is eventually exposed. LBJ lied to get us into Vietnam; Reagan lied to invade Grenada and to overthrow the Sandinista government in the “Contra war” in Nicaragua; George W. Bush lied about weapons of mass destruction to wage war in Iraq. The list goes on and on. Service members, vets, the American public and those in far off lands who are subjugated by our political, military and economic “leaders” pay the price in blood and treasure for these lies and wars. Meanwhile, the war profiteers get rich.

Fourteen American resisters from the Afghanistan and Iraq wars, some of whom are veterans and others who fled to Canada rather than continue their part in the two wars, sent a representative to the Bradley Manning protest on June 1 with a statement which she read at the rally: It stated in part:

“Many of you might remember what it was like under similar circumstances during the Vietnam War. Unfortunately, we are living proof that not much has changed since then. The imperialist war machine is still turning out young killers with factory-like efficiency. Nowadays at the crew-served weapons ranges at Ft. Benning, they teach you to hold the butterfly trigger for three words, four syllables: “die-Hajji-die”. Since the start of these wars, thousands of U.S troops have deployed overseas to kill and die for these scumbags who run the show: the profiteers and the zealots. But, just as in all wars that are unjust and based on false pretenses, there springs forth an organic resistance to the bullshit.

Young people like Camilo Mejia, Mike Prysner, Kelly Doherty, Jeremy Hinzman, and Bradley Manning– you can’t really fit us into one category. We are not all socialists; we are not all pacifists; not all of us began our resistance from a place of ideology. Some of us had to see and do the things we did to figure out that we didn’t want to do them anymore, and some of us figured it out right away. We here in Canada left our contracts early, while those resisters who chose to stay behind became outspoken while respecting their contracts. Resistance has been unique to each individual-as it should be.”

This new generation of young war resisters has said ‘no’ to being a part of the U.S. military machine. They’re risking a lot to speak the truth from their ‘inside’ perspective. Bradley Manning risked everything to speak truth from his perspective. And at the Ft. Meade Main Gate they are represented by fellow young vets and by seasoned vets for whom the “organic resistance” to injustice and war has endured a lifetime.

The trial is expected to continue through the summer. You can be sure that U.S. veterans will continue to be there, supporting the truth-telling patriot and exposing the real criminals-the corporate-military-industrial-financial elites.

Photo: Dozens of veterans and activists demonstrated at President Obama’s campaign office in Oakland, Calif., August 2012, demanding Pfc. Bradley Manning’s freedom. (Bradley Manning Support/CC)

via Perspectives on Pfc. Bradley Manning from an anti-war veteran » peoplesworld.

The WikiLeaks Truck Is Still Rustling Jimmies at Bradley Manning’s Trial


Artist Clark Stoeckley, the owner of the mobile performance art piece known as the WikiLeaks truck, is one of a handful of activists and reporters that consistently attend Bradley Manning’s trial, which resumed today. Even so, guards at Fort Meade weren’t sure what to think when earlier today Stoeckley cruised up to the base in his truck.

“Dressed as a redneck, I went up to all of the NSA and Army guys photographing “What the Hell is up with this truck?” tweeted Stoeckley, along with a photo of one agent. “They were dumbfounded.”

Given that the US military has banned army personnel from looking at anything related to WikiLeaks, it’s no surprise that military personnel may have been unsure how to deal with a guy driving up in a WikiLeaks box truck. One blogger has called Stoeckley’s constant presence at Fort Meade a “symbolic slap in the face,” and it’s clear he’s at least made his presence known. Earlier this month, canine units searched his truck before Stoeckley was given permission to park on the base, and whenever he enters or leaves the base he is accompanied by a police escort.

In a brief phone interview, Stoeckley explained that the army personnel “descended on the truck” following a “change of command ceremony.” He then proceeded to “play with them” by asking them seemingly naive questions like “What is this about?”

“They were like, ‘It’s the Manning trial, and I was like, ‘Who is Manning?’” laughed Stoeckley. “Some were laughing, some were pissed, and it was really confusing to them why my truck was on the base and how it got there,” he added. “It was the topic of conversation while they were going back to their cars.”

Besides giving rides to activists from New York City to Fort Meade, Stoeckley also draws the courtroom proceedings and uploads them to Flickr, making him a well-known fixture at Manning’s trial. In fact, he announced his illustrations and first-hand accounts would be published in a book to be released this upcoming October.

Dealing with authorities while driving around in his truck is nothing new for Stoeckley. Back during the height of Occupy Wall Street, Stoeckley’s truck was seized, searched and temporary lost by police, for example.

As of this writing, Stoeckley’s truck is still rustling the jimmies of guards and NSA guys at Fort Meade. And so far, Stoeckley’s seemingly gentle trolling of Fort Meade appears to be a healthy give-and-take between the artist and law enforcement: While speaking to me over the phone, an officer was writing Stoeckley a ticket.

By Fruzsina Eördögh 10 hours ago

Tags: bradley manning, WikiLeaks

Read more: http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/the-wikileaks-truck-is-still-rustling-jimmies-at-bradley-mannings-trial-1#ixzz2XIv8PTzO

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via The WikiLeaks Truck Is Still Rustling Jimmies at Bradley Manning’s Trial | Motherboard.

A Round up of Bradley Manning News


Bradley Manning: Truth on trial?

Aljazeera.com
 available yet. Report. Published on Jun 24, 2013. This week, a special edition of the Listening Post with a special report on Bradley Manning and an exclusive interview with Wikileaks founder Julian Assange from inside the Ecuadorian embassy in London.
See all stories on this topic »

 

Roundup on Week 3 of Bradley Manning’s Trial
Firedoglake
As the trial of Pfc. Bradley Manning, the soldier who disclosed United States government information to WikiLeaks, enters its fourth week, the world’s focus is on NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden and his travel to Ecuador, where he has requested asylum.
See all stories on this topic »
 
The 10 best whistleblowers in movie history
Perth Now
By disclosing top-secret materials from one of the world’s most secretive agencies, the NSA, Snowden will join the ranks of Mark Felt, Daniel Ellsberg and Bradley Manning as a man who willingly gave up all the comforts and security of his life in an 
See all stories on this topic »
 
Westwood gets political
USA TODAY
Westwood gets political. Known for her activism, Vivienne Westwood‘s latest collection shown in Milan included pictures of Bradley Manning, a US Army officer arrested in Iraq in 2010 on suspicion of passing classified material to WikiLeaks, pinned to 
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Comment: Obama’s list of enemies
SBS
Activists display a photo of US President Barack Obama and pictures of former US spy Edward Snowden and whistleblower Bradley Manning during a protest action in Berlin. (AAP). Meet the seven men US President Barack Obama considers enemies of the 
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I’m convinced people do care about NSA overreach
San Diego CityBEAT
On June 6, The Guardian began reporting on the most significant unauthorized government document dump since Bradley Manning smuggled out hundreds of thousands of State Department records while pretending to rock out to Lady Gaga. This time 
See all stories on this topic » 

America: Have We Lost Our Way?

OpEdNews
Gitmo, Bradley Manning, violating sovereignty willy nilly, drone strikes even on American citizens… Basic disrespect for the principles we have preached so self-righteously to the world, on a scale that makes even prior hypocrisies (Reagan’s Central 
See all stories on this topic » 

Letter: Real criminals rigged game against Manning

Buffalo News
Pfc. Bradley Manning reported war crimes, which clearly indicated U.S. criminality, according to three articles of the Geneva Conventions. According to Nuremberg principles laid down by the United States, Manning was required to report war crimes. Yet 
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The Eternal Rebel – Ronnie Kasrils
AllAfrica.com
As the state calcifies into corporate totalitarianism, as prominent rebels such as Julian Assange,Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden are defamed by a bankrupt media and political class and hunted down as criminals, as change through the established 
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The Pursuit of Edward Snowden: Washington in a Rage, Striving to Run the World
Huffington Post
Too rarely mentioned is the combination of nonviolence and idealism that has been integral to the courageous whistleblowing by Edward Snowden and Bradley Manning. Right now, one is on a perilous journey across the globe in search of political asylum, 
See all stories on this topic » 
The Trouble with Low Standards
The National Interest Online
The Snowden disclosure of course comes as another famous leaker, Army PFC Bradley Manning, is being tried for espionage at Fort Meade, Maryland. There’s some indication that Snowden sees himself as a fellow traveler of Manning; he has described the 
See all stories on this topic » 
Secrets and fears of a paranoid government
ABC Online
As well as Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden, they’ve also charged a former CIA officer for revealing the names of colleagues involved in torture, a State Department advisor for leaking information about North Korea, and a senior executive at the 
See all stories on this topic » 
Snowden’s Asylum Request: ‘Unlikely I Would Receive Fair Trial or Proper 
Firedoglake
My case is also very similar to that of the American soldier Bradley Manning, who made public government information through Wikileaks revealing war crimes, was arrested by the United States government and has been treated inhumanely during his time in 
See all stories on this topic » 
Julian Assange: Edward Snowden Is ‘Safe And Healthy’
Huffington Post
 yet that Snowden’s fate is bound up with the assistance he receives from WikiLeaks, the noted transparency organization that came to its greatest fame three years ago when it released a massive cache of documents from Army Pfc. Bradley Manning.
See all stories on this topic » 
Edward Snowden Realizes He Can’t Live Without WikiLeaks
National Journal
Edward Snowden may not have chosen to go the route of fellow Espionage Act indictee Bradley Manning by releasing sensitive National Security Agency documents through WikiLeaks. Part of that, he said, was because he wanted every single page 
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Edward Snowden and the High Price of Civil Disobedience
Slate Magazine
To get an idea of what Snowden is staring down, we can just look at the case of WikiLeaks sourceBradley Manning. He was held for two years without trial (and, by some accounts, tortured) for releasing classified document. In March 2012, the Guardian 
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Whither Snowden? NSA whistleblower skips Moscow-Havana flight
Christian Science Monitor
Though Snowden himself remains invisible, Ecuador’s foreign minister, Ricardo Patiño Aroca, read out a statement from him – reported by the Guardian – in which he compares himself with Bradley Manning, the former US army private currently on trial for 
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Julian Assange: Snowden is ‘Healthy, Safe and in Good Spirits’
TIME
Assange did tie Snowden’s case closely to that of Army private Bradley Manning, now on trial for leaking millions of pages of classified documents to WikiLeaks, in the episode that has made Assange an international celebrity. Assange said that U.S. 
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Snowden joins list of infamous political fugitives
NBCNews.com (blog)
 the founder of WikiLeaks, published reams of U.S. military and diplomatic documents. There have been no formal charges filed against him for the leaks, but Bradley Manning is currently on trial for allegedly giving WikiLeaks sensitive military 
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US Cracks Down on Leaks With Insider Threat Program
The Takeaway
Launched not long after Private Bradley Manning shared classified documents with the website WikiLeaks, the program gives government agencies greater authority to investigate and punish potential leaks. To discuss this we’re joined by Kel McClanahan, 
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Revenge of Assange as WikiLeaks helps US leaker
AFP
He linked his own fate not only with 30-year-old Snowden but with that of Bradley Manning, 25, the US soldier who is being tried on accusations of leaking the documents to WikiLeaks that were behind its first major information dumps in 2010. WikiLeaks 
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Attorneys in Bradley Manning Trial Fight Over Tweet Authenticity


Bradley-Manning

The military trial in the case of Wikileaker Bradley Manning continued earlier this week.  An interesting legal point in the case has arisen, as Manning’s defense lawyers pushed back against tweets that the prosecution wanted introduced as evidence.

Allow me first to provide a little bit of background on why the tweets in question are even being discussed in the case.

One of the key issues in the case has been the relationship between Army Private First Class Bradley Manning and Wikileaks, and its founder Julian Assange.  Prosecutors have alleged that Manning was influenced by Wikileaks to leak some of the confidential documents.  (Manning has already admitted to leaking the documents, but has denied more serious accusations, including that he knowingly aided the enemy).

Previously released chat logs between Manning and ex-hacker Adrian Lamo, who earlier testified in the case, have established that Manning had been in contact with Wikileaks, but there remains contention between prosecution and defense about to what extent and when that contact occurred.  They also continue to argue over whether or not Manning’s actions were influenced by Wikileaks, or if there was any collusion between the two.  This has been a crucial point as well for federal prosecutors seeking to build a case against Julian Assange.

On Tuesday, prosecutors and defense attorneys argued over a couple of tweets in particular.  One of those tweets, alleged to have been posted from the Wikileaks Twitter account on 7/8/2010, asks for the public to assist in providing .mil email addresses to Wikileaks.  Another on 1/8/2010 posted by Wikileaks referenced having an encrypted video of a U.S. air attack (referring to what we now know was the “Collateral Damage” video, one of the items in the files leaked by Manning and later edited and published by Wikileaks).  Prosecutors argue that this further emphasizes evidence of a leak, and that it should be admissible as part of its broader argument on the point.

Special Agent Mark Mander of the Army Criminal Investigative Command testified about how he went about determining the tweets were from Wikileaks’ account.  In the past, he first went to the Wikileaks Twitter account directly and saw the tweet personally; then he more recently collected it from a Google cache version and the content in both was the same.  Mander testified that Google cache is something that he has used regularly in his capacity as a CID agent investigating computer intrusions and computer crimes.  He also explained a variety of other steps he took, in addition to obtaining cached versions of the tweets, to cross-check the authenticity of the tweets as being that of Wikileaks.

But Manning’s defense attorneys challenged the authenticity of such tweets.

From Reuters:

“Anyone can create a Web page…that looks like WikiLeaks or that looks like Twitter,” argued defense attorney Captain Joshua Tooman when the government sought to admit a May 7, 2010 tweet from WikiLeaks seeking military Internet addresses, and the Web page of the Internet archive site archive.org that showed a 2009 WikiLeaks “Most Wanted” list of items it was seeking from the public.

Tooman said a government investigator had accessed the tweets indirectly, through Google, rather than directly through Twitter or WikiLeaks. He said the evidence failed to meet the test of authenticity since there was no way of knowing what the website looked like when the tweet or page was published.

The argument from the defense about the tweets’ authenticity raises an interesting legal point that could potentially influence similar arguments in civilian cases.

While it’s accurate that anyone can create a web page that mimics a legitimate site – in fact we’ve seen this in other circumstances that have been the subject of recent news reports, such as when Wikileaks Punked the NY Times – there surely needs to be some acceptable standard for authenticating tweets and other content that has since been archived and may no longer be available online.  Most would assume that the standard tools regularly used to find archived content, like Google cache and the Internet Archive (formerly the WayBackMachine), would be acceptable in these instances, coupled of course with additional cross-checking.  But the Manning defense team argues that it’s not.

If the judge determines that Google cache and other such tools are not an acceptable way to authenticate archived tweets, it poses an interesting question about how this might influence similar arguments going forward (not necessarily as precedent, but just as a general point).

You can read the entire day’s testimony in this particular argument in the unofficial court transcript for 6/18 provided by Freedom of the Press Foundation.

It will be interesting to see what the decision is on this matter.  Proceedings resume in the Manning trial on June 26th.

via Attorneys in Bradley Manning Trial Fight Over Tweet Authenticity.

Bradley Manning News Round up


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Bradley Manning’s Trial, Day 8 (Live Updates)
Firedoglake
12:08PM EST Government defends admissibility of evidence that it thinks shows that Manningconspired with WikiLeaks. For an in-depth look at this point during today’s proceedings, read here. 11:08AM EST Prosecution argues that if WikiLeaks has a plan 
See all stories on this topic »
Russell Brand Says Bradley Manning Is A Hero
The Inquisitr
“I happen to believe that Bradley Manning has the right to a fair trial; it seems clear to me that some of the charges against him are mendacious and duplicitous from the outset … The things I’d say I’m highly qualified to talk about are drugs and 
See all stories on this topic »I am Bradley Manning (full HD)
YouTube
Peter Sarsgaard Angela Davis Moby Molly Crabapple Tim DeChristopher. LT Dan Choi Bishop George Packard Russell Brand Allan Nairn Chris Hedges Wallace Shawn Adhaf Soueif Josh Stieber Michael Ratner Copyright: Bradley Manning Support Network 
See all stories on this topic »From Afghanistan, Thank You Bradley Manning!
Antiwar.com (blog)
The 75,000 Afghan War Logs, which Bradley Manning gave Wikileaks to ‘help document the true cost of wars in Iraq and Afghanistan’, can help all of us evaluate whether the Afghan war is cost-effective. Bradley Manning had also handed Wikileaks a video 
See all stories on this topic »Speed of Bradley Manning Trial Masks Prosecutors’ Struggles
FRONTLINE
Bradley Manning’s court-martial was already in weekend recess as of midday Tuesday, marking the third consecutive week the court has finished far ahead of schedule. Since the court-martial began, the court’s week has never gone later than Wednesday 
See all stories on this topic »Whistleblowing 2.0 — from the Pentagon Papers to Bradley Manning to PRISM
Waging Nonviolence
With computer technician Edward Snowden’s bombshell revelations about the extent of state snooping — coupled with the ongoing court martial of Private Bradley Manning — 2013 is the year of the whistleblower. These ongoing cases also highlight the 
See all stories on this topic »“A Different Kind of Patriotism”: Russell Brand on Bradley Manning
Gawker
Today marks the eighth day of Bradley Manning’s court-martial for leaking more than 700,000 United States government documents to Wikileaks. Although the 25-year-old former Army intelligence analyst has confessed to disclosing classified information, 
See all stories on this topic »Manning WikiLeaks case in recess until June 25
Timesonline.com
Pfc. Bradley Manning’s court-martial over giving massive amounts of classified material to WikiLeaks has gone into recess until next week. The prosecution and defense will spend the next week negotiating written statements from some 17 witnesses, in 
See all stories on this topic »Manning WikiLeaks case in recess
Herald Sun
US soldier Bradley Manning’s trial for giving massive amounts of classified material to WikiLeaks has gone into recess until next week. The prosecution and defence will spend the next week negotiating written statements from 17 witnesses, in lieu of 
See all stories on this topic »Manning WikiLeaks case in recess until June 25 while attorneys negotiate 
The Province
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, left, is escorted out of a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Monday, June 17, 2013, after the start of the third week of his court martial. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by sending troves of classified 
See all stories on this topic »Public access fight over Manning docs in Md. court
Businessweek
BALTIMORE (AP) — A government lawyer said Monday the U.S. Army has released the vast majority of court records in Pfc. Bradley Manning’s case and told a civilian judge the dispute over the records had become moot. A lawyer for a constitutional rights 
See all stories on this topic »Manning’s Team Questions Secrecy of Leaked Data
Courthouse News Service
MEADE, Md. (CN) – The “secret” profiles of Guantanamo detainees disclosed by Pfc. Bradley Manning contained information that may have been publicly available for years, government witnesses testified by stipulation. The nearly 800 documents published 
See all stories on this topic »Court hears public access fight over Manning records
The Star Democrat
Army Pfc. Bradley Manning steps out of a security vehicle as he is escorted into a courthouse in Fort Meade, Md., Monday, June 17, 2013, for the start of the third week of his court martial. Manning is charged with indirectly aiding the enemy by 
See all stories on this topic »Government Defends Admissibility of Evidence That It Thinks Shows Manning 
Firedoglake
Pfc. Bradley Manning, who is on trial at Fort Meade for releasing United States government information to WikiLeaks, does not face any conspiracy charges. However, this morning there were arguments on a motion that related to defense objections over 
See all stories on this topic »siliconANGLE » Manning, Snowden Cases Highlight the Importance of Basic 
SiliconANGLE (blog)
Army Pfc Bradley Manning is facing a military judge in a court-martial procedure that will endure over many weeks. Be aware that rights and procedures in a court-martial are quite different than that of a civilian trial. The issue at hand is the public 
See all stories on this topic »Disputed Tweets May not Fly in Manning Trial
Courthouse News Service
MEADE, Md. (CN) – Prosecutors fought Tuesday to use Twitter postings they hope will depict Pfc.Bradley Manning as a WikiLeaks foot soldier, rather than its journalistic source. Months before his trial, the 25-year-old soldier acknowledged he uploaded 
See all stories on this topic »Manning trial focuses on whether tweets meet evidence standards
NBCNews.com (blog)
Lawyers for Private First Class Bradley Manning, 25, who is accused of providing more than 700,000 files to the anti-secrecy website in the biggest breach of classified U.S. data in the nation’s history, argued on Tuesday that Twitter postings offered 
See all stories on this topic »Guardian Weekly Letters, 21 June 2013
The Guardian
Fitting that Bradley Manning’s photo should be juxtaposed in World Roundup (7 June) with the famous shot of the Tiananmen Square tank stand-off, on the occasion of the release of the last “counter-revolutionary”, Jiang Yaqun. Our 19th-century idea “My 
See all stories on this topic »Medina Roshan, REUTERS
London Free Press
U.S. Army Private First Class Bradley Manning (C) is escorted in handcuffs as he leaves the courthouse in Fort Meade, Maryland, in this June 6, 2012 file photo. (REUTERS/Jose Luis Magana/Files). Tweet · Bookmark and Share. Change text size for the story.
See all stories on this topic »Obama’s One-Way Mirror
The Indypendent
There is something very wrong with this picture: Today I am in a federal court arguing that the press and public have a right to have access to daily transcripts and court documents in the trial of whistleblower Bradley Manning; meanwhile, Verizon is 
See all stories on this topic »China: Snowden Case Like Shawshank Redemption
PJ Media
China: Snowden Case Like Shawshank Redemption. Xinhua also compared the NSA leaker to Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, Julian Assange and Bradley Manning. by. Bridget Johnson. Bio. June 18, 2013 – 11:00 am. Page 1 of 2 Next -> View as Single 
See all stories on this topic »Sphere of Influence says Insider Threats are Detectable
The Herald | HeraldOnline.com
Sphere of Influence, a technology company specializing in advanced “Big Data” analytics and behavioral analysis, is informing organizations that losses from insider threats, such as those caused by Edward Snowden and Bradley Manning, can be reduced or 
See all stories on this topic »Ai Weiwei on his incarceration: “They never looked away from me, 24 hours a day”
Salon
The three men she singled out from the stage – Julian Assange, Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden – all pasty-looking, unlikely Robin Hoods of classified information, are acquiring the cachet of rock stars. So too is Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei 
See all stories on this topic »Issue 25: Fashion Issue
Baltimore City Paper
In Mobtown Beat, Van Smith looks into a lawsuit to make the evidence in whistleblower Bradley Manning’s court-martial case open to the public and Edward Ericson Jr. details the tax incentives the city gives to millionaire developers. In City Folk, Bret 
See all stories on this topic »Julian Assange Timeline Of Events Leading To Ecuadorian Embassy Refuge Bid
Huffington Post UK
In 2009, Bradley Manning, a United States Army Intelligence Private, allegedly contacted Mr Assange and is later accused of leaking classified information. In 2010 Manning is charged with leaking secret diplomatic cables and is held in prison in the US.
See all stories on this topic »Public enemy
The News International
A good example is the recurrence of phrases like ‘endangered our national security’ and ‘aided the enemy,’ in reference to leaks by people like Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden. These intend to evoke certain associations in the minds of listeners 
See all stories on this topic »Without Waiting for Proof, Edward Snowden Foes Begin Spreading Smears
Daily Beast
Let me suggest an alternative explanation: Bradley Manning. The trial of the man who handed over classified information to Wikileaks founder Julian Assange is a cautionary tale for all wannabe whistleblowers. While being held for nearly three years 
See all stories on this topic »9/11 Case Motions Hearing: June 18 Session
Lawfare (blog)
Dew glistens on the lawn just outside Fort Meade’s Burba Cottage—-our usual haunt, Smallwood Hall, being unavailable on account of the ongoing Bradley Manning trial. Lawfare is in the house for a second day of CCTV-broadcasted motions hearings in 
See all stories on this topic »
SF Examiner President Talks Free Michelle Shocked Concert
SFist
While Vogt seems to be claiming that he is giving the squawky singer an opportunity to be held accountable for her actions earlier this year, any attempt to paint this as a noble effort to support journalism, or Gay Pride, or Bradley Manning or even ad 
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One room, 10188 tweets and £9000 on takeouts: Julian Assange’s year in the 
Evening Standard
In one of the chatroom conversations of May 2010 that now form the basis of his court-martial, US Army private and WikiLeaks source Bradley Manning referred to Julian Assange as “a crazy, white-haired Aussie who can’t seem to stay in one country very 
See all stories on this topic »
Julian Assange Has Been Inside for a Year
Motherboard (blog)
It’s a sort of absurdist parallel narrative to the trial of Pfc. Bradley Manning. The two figures are inextricably linked, and together, their saga reads like Miltonic poetry. Or a blockbuster film. Indeed, in Alex Gibney’s recent documentary We Steal 
See all stories on this topic »
Open and Shut Case
Baltimore City Paper
On May 22, the New York-based Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR) filed a suit asking for a court order to end pervasive secrecy surrounding the court-martial proceedings against another leaker, U.S. Army Private Bradley Manning, who in 2010 
See all stories on this topic »

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Bradley Manning – What the Papers are saying


download (1)

Bradley Manning WikiLeaks Court-Martial Enters Third Week
Huffington Post
BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. Prosecutors are moving quickly through the court-martial of Pfc.Bradley Manning. The former Army intelligence analyst is charged with aiding the enemy. He has acknowledged sending reams of government secrets to 
See all stories on this topic »
Bradley Manning’s Trial, Day 7 (Live Updates)
Firedoglake
I think there’ll be a ruling from the judge on the admissibility of the 2009 WikiLeaks “Most Wanted” list. Numerous stipulations of testimony are expected in military court at Fort Meade during the seventh day of Pfc. Bradley Manning’s trial. The focus 
See all stories on this topic »
WikiLeaks trial focuses Army email list
KTAR.com
 email addresses an Army private allegedly downloaded to a personal computer could be used by foreign adversaries to launch cyberattacks on service members, a government witness said Monday as the trial of Pfc. Bradley Manning entered its third week.
See all stories on this topic »
Belfast anti-G8 protesters show support for Bradley Manning
Belfast Telegraph
Comments. Email; Print; Font Size. Protesters opposed to next week’s G8 meeting of world leaders have held up placards spelling out the name of US soldier Bradley Manning, suspected of passing classified information to website Wikileaks. Comments.
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Julian Assange Lawsuit Over Bradley Manning Secrecy Argued In Federal Court
Huffington Post
BALTIMORE — Lawyers for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange duked it out in federal court on Monday with the government over whether the press and public have enough access to records in the court-martial of Bradley Manning, the Army private first class 
See all stories on this topic »
Dispute over documents in the case of Bradley Manning heads to federal court 
Washington Post
BALTIMORE — A dispute over public access to court records in the military trial of Pfc. Bradley Manning is moving from a military court to a civilian one. The New York-based Center for Constitutional Rights initially petitioned an army court in 2012 
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Manning list ‘could prompt attacks’
Belfast Telegraph
 of troop names and email addresses a US army private allegedly downloaded to a personal computer could be used by foreign adversaries to launch cyber attacks on service members, a government witness said as the trial of Bradley Manning entered its 
See all stories on this topic »
Public access fight over Manning docs in Md. court
The Seattle Times
Public access fight over Manning docs in Md. court. A government lawyer said Monday the U.S. Army has released the vast majority of court records in Pfc. Bradley Manning’s case and told a civilian judge the dispute over the records had become moot.
See all stories on this topic »
Maryland: Manning Trial Looks at Address Disclosures
New York Times
Prosecutors laid the groundwork on Monday for trying to prove that Pfc. Bradley Manning gave WikiLeaks the e-mail addresses of more than 70,000 troops deployed in Iraq, a charge to which he has pleaded not guilty. As Private Manning’s trial at Fort 
See all stories on this topic »
Manning’s WikiLeaks trial enters 3rd week
Times of India
FORT MEADE, Maryland: The trial of Bradley Manning now focuses on leaked documents related to the US prison at Guantanamo Bay. The former Army intelligence analyst is charged with aiding the enemy. He has acknowledged sending thousands of 
See all stories on this topic »
Oliver Stone Calls Edward Snowden a Hero
Hollywood Reporter
Stone went on to praise the founder of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange, and whistle blower Bradley Manning. He condemned president Barack Obama’s administration for prosecuting six whistleblower cases despite campaign promises of a more progressive 
See all stories on this topic »
WikiLeaks Founder Goes To Court For Access To Bradley Manning Trial Docs
Bayoubuzz
Physical access to hearings has not been at issue, but the military judge overseeing the case, Col. Denise Lind, has kept transcripts and crucial court motions locked away. The secrecy prompted WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, along with other 
See all stories on this topic »
David Brooks, Tom Friedman, Bill Keller Wish Snowden Had Just Followed Orders
Huffington Post
Manning was not working out as a soldier, and they discussed keeping him back when his unit was deployed to Iraq,” biographer Chase Madar writes in The Passion of Bradley Manning. “However, in the fall of 2009, the occupation was desperate for 
See all stories on this topic »
Stand With Snowden! Free Bradley Manning! Close Guantánamo!
Scoop.co.nz (press release)
Activists supporting whistleblowers Bradley Manning and Edward Snowden, and calling for the closure of the U.S. prison at Guantánamo, will demonstrate at Senator Feinstein’s office in reply to Feinstein’s remarks accusing Edward Snowden of “treason 
See all stories on this topic »
Public Access Fight Over Manning Docs in Maryland Court
The Epoch Times
This undated photo released Tuesday, June 4, 2013 by the U.S. Army shows a noose Pfc. Bradley Manning made from a bedsheet while he was being detained in Kuwait shortly after his arrest in May 2010. The photo was presented as evidence at a hearing 
See all stories on this topic »
NOW PLAYING AT ART THEATRE: ‘We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks’
Long Beach Post
History will forever link WikiLeaks and PFC Bradley Manning, and We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLinks will be one of the defining documents on this binary system, jointly responsible for history’s biggest leak of state secrets. And while writer 
See all stories on this topic »
Legal Events to Watch This Week
Wall Street Journal (blog)
This week: The trials of James “Whitey” Bulger, George Zimmerman and Bradley Manningcontinue, and the U.S. Supreme Court is poised to deliver a blockbuster or two. Monday, June 17. • The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to issue orders and opinions.
See all stories on this topic »
Medina Roshan, REUTERS
Welland Tribune
U.S. Army Private First Class Bradley Manning enters the courtroom for day four of his court martial at Fort Meade, Maryland in this June 10, 2013, file photo. 12, 2013. REUTERS/Gary Cameron/Files. Tweet · Bookmark and Share. Change text size for the 
See all stories on this topic »
Manning’s WikiLeaks court-martial enters third week
SCNow
Posted: Monday, June 17, 2013 6:46 am. Manning’s WikiLeaks court-martial enters third week Associated Press |. FORT MEADE, Md. — Prosecutors are moving quickly through the court-martial of Pfc. Bradley Manning. The former Army intelligence analyst is 
See all stories on this topic »
Why do people lie and why do others believe them?
Newsroom Panama
Meanwhile the names of Bradley Manning, Robert Snowden and Julian Assange are known around the world as whistle blowers extraordinaire , hailed by millions, hated by authorities. We are bombarded with lies every day from politicians, advertisers, 
See all stories on this topic »
WikiLeaks breach included secret details on Guantanamo prisoners: official
WHTC
Data released by Private First Class Bradley Manning included biographical material on Guantanamo prisoners, details of their religious affiliation, and names of their relatives with extremist links, Rear Admiral David Woods, who ran the Guantanamo 
See all stories on this topic »
Coalition bipartisan on treatment of Assange
Manning River Times
But she added that the trial of US Army private Bradley Manning might “cast further light on whether WikiLeaks breached any US laws in obtaining that information”. Mr Assange has lived at the Ecuadorian embassy in London for a year, having been granted 
See all stories on this topic »
Oliver Stone Says Edward Snowden Is a Hero
Hollywood Reporter
Stone went on to praise WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and Bradley Manning, and condemned President Barack Obama’s adminstration for prosecuting whistleblowers. SHANGHAI – Outspoken director Oliver Stone brought thunderous applause to of 
See all stories on this topic »
AP PHOTOS: Chilean torture center becomes shelter
NBC 29 News
Manning’s WikiLeaks court-martial enters 3rd week · Manning’s WikiLeaks court-martial enters 3rd week. Prosecutors are moving quickly through the court-martial of Pfc. Bradley Manning.Full Story. Prosecutors are moving quickly through the court-martial 
See all stories on this topic »
McCain presses Obama on secret emails
WGCL Atlanta
Prosecutors are moving quickly through the court-martial of Pfc. Bradley Manning.More >. A huge database of troop names and email addresses an Army private allegedly downloaded to a personal computer could be used by foreign adversaries to launch 
See all stories on this topic »
Question motives of Snowden, writer
Las Vegas Sun
If public opinion is that Snowden’s actions deserve whistle-blower protection while Pfc. Bradley Manning is being tried for treason, then public opinion (as usual) is mistaken. It’s questionable that Manning and WikiLeaks jeopardized our national 
See all stories on this topic »
Experts doubt intel-leaker Snowden qualifies as whistleblower under federal law
The Republic
Pfc. Bradley Manning is being court-martialed for giving sensitive diplomatic cables, videos and reports to the website WikiLeaks. The soldier’s case is stirring interest anew in Daniel Ellsberg. A former RAND Corp. military analyst, Ellsberg stood 
See all stories on this topic »
Obama’s One-Way Mirror
Truth-Out
This problem of one-way transparency is exemplified by how the government is dealing with the most important criminal trial involving leaks of classified information since the Pentagon Papers: the court-martial of Bradley Manning. The government has 
See all stories on this topic »
Whistle Blowers, Deep States, and Sunlight
Asbarez Armenian News
Daniel Ellsberg (The Pentagon Papaers), Sibel Edmonds (Turkish money in U.S. politics), Julian Assange/Bradley Manning (Wikileaks), and now Ed Snowden (NSA-phone-gate [that’s my invented term]). These are among the best known of the leakers who 
See all stories on this topic »
On Second Thought
Deseret News
Ellsberg: We note the excused absence of Pfc. Bradley Manning. We’d also like to welcome our newest member, Edward Snowden! Snowden: Thank you. Julian Assange: Welcome, although I knew you’d be here. Snowden: How’s that? Assange: I took the 
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Bradley Manning- Latest News


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Bradley Manning’s Accomplishments

OpEdNews
Most comments about PFC Bradley Manning miss the obviously obvious here. To see what Manning accomplished in his nearly-impossible situation, we must take into account at least five sets of rules: those for his job as a security analyst; for his oath 
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Bradley Manning Lynching: Judge Runs A Shell Game, Public Excluded from 

Center for Research on Globalization
To Have a Constitutional Public Trial, Don’t You Have to Let the Public in? Public access to theBradley Manning court-martial doesn’t exist in any meaningful sense, despite the demands of the U.S. Constitution or the Manual for Courts Martial United 
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The whistleblowers are the new generation of American patriots

The Guardian
It is from this generation that the most recent prominent whistleblowers have emerged: Edward Snowden, 29, the former National Security Agency contractor, now on the run after passing evidence of mass snooping to the Guardian; Bradley Manning, who at 
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US soldier goes on trial over WikiLeaks disclosures

Frontier Post
AFP_WASHINGTON: Bradley Manning, the American soldier who handed thousands of secret US government files to WikiLeaks, will finally go on trial on Monday — more than three years after he was arrested in Iraq. Manning, who faces a possible 154-year 
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Newer generation with a deep belief

Financial Times
Sir, I do note that both Bradley Manning and now Edward Snowden are younger men, not the baby-boomer generation that still controls things politically and the military-industrial complex (“Whistleblower poses test for US-Sino ties”, June 10).
See all stories on this topic »

 

Trial and error

Warrnambool Standard
Bradley Manning is a 25-year-old soldier in the United States Army. He was arrested in May 2010 for having “leaked” more than 700,000 confidential US diplomatic and military documents to WikiLeaks while working as an intelligence analyst in Baghdad 
See all stories on this topic »

 

Fighting the Secrecy/Surveillance State

Truth-Out
(Photo: re:publicaThe emergence of Bradley Manning, Julian Assange and now Edward Snowden represents just the tip of the iceberg of a popular resistance that is challenging the U.S. government’s excesses in secrecy and surveillance, a movement that 
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The darker side of US policy comes to light

Gulf Daily News
Let’s remember the Bradley Manning affair – a sergeant with one of the military divisions who provided the WikiLeaks site with thousands, if not millions, of pieces of classified information, which were then made available to the public. Many people 
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Who said it?

South China Morning Post
Julian Assange on the Bradley Manning case. He will have to neutralise extremists in both the reformist and conservative camps. Analyst Amir Mohebian on the challenge for Iran’s new president, Hassan Rowhani. I want to catch terrorists as much as any 
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” AUDIO/TRANSCRIPT: Interview with ‘Pentagon Papers’ Whistleblower Daniel …
Brad Blog (blog)
And whether we were willing to continue that, continue our careers, which might be very comfortable in his case and mine (much more than Bradley Manning’s, for example) or do something to inform the public that would undoubtedly confront us with 
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Chris Hedges Will Be Back

Truthdig
 all his previous columns by clicking over to his author page. And, in case you missed it, you can also watch his recent interview on “Democracy Now!” here and see his appearance in a new video campaign supporting whistle-blower Bradley Manning here.
See all stories on this topic »

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100 Films in a Year

12 months. 100 films. Hopefully.

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